What are the 7 Stages of Dementia?

Dementia is a term that describes memory loss in an individual, especially for older adults. It is associated with difficulty in thinking, language, and problem-solving struggles. The symptoms of dementia may take a long time to surface, which is why you need to understand the illness. This will help you to study a loved one and respond appropriately.

This article explains the seven stages you will notice over time from a dementia patient.

Stage One:

At the first stage of dementia, the disease is mild, and you would hardly notice any symptoms. Except for medical checks, affected individuals will still continually carry on with routines. Hence, there are no changes related to behavioral problems or memory loss.

Stage one

Stage two:

The symptoms begin to surface mildly at this stage. This includes slight forgetfulness, aging, and other cognitive declination. Although health experts will perform a better job, it does not mean they can identify the symptoms at first glance. Hence, it is almost invisible as the stage one symptoms.

Stage three

Stage three:

At stage three, the symptoms of cognitive decline become more evident. Patients tend to forget things quickly and find it difficult to retain information. When you realize a loved one does not perform excellently, as usual, make sure to check on them. Sometimes, they may engage in many activities, but they will be unproductive. This is because of the lack of attention to the work being done.

Stage four:

At stage three, the symptoms of cognitive decline become more evident. Patients tend to forget things quickly and find it difficult to retain information. When you realize a loved one does not perform excellently, as usual, make sure to check on them. Sometimes, they may engage in many activities, but they will be unproductive. This is because of the lack of attention to the work being done.

Stage five:

You should closely monitor the daily routine of the affected party. It is also easier for doctors to identify symptoms at this stage. Patients may begin to zone out, forgetting the daily activities. Short-term memory is the common symptom here, as victims may not remember basic things. This may include contact address, time, date, or office address.

Stage five

Stage six:

The rate of memory loss here is of bigger effect. It is often associated with fear, anxiety, agitations, and delusions. Patients forget recent events, and they may not remember loved ones. Hence, patients will not communicate properly as expected. More so, the difficulty in speaking is evident here, coupled with the inability to control their bladder.

Stage seven

Stage seven:

Stage seven is referred to as the late dementia period. The rate of cognitive declination is high, and patients can’t keep track of anything. This also affects the speaking, walking, and general reasoning capacity. Caregivers would need to assist the patient with movement and implement another means of communication. More so, caregivers need to be present 24/7, to deliver quality services. Always bear in mind to provide comfort for patients and also maintain a good life’s quality with them.

Conclusion:

Helping individuals with dementia should be a collective effort. Although the disease is non-reversible, families and friends can provide emotional support for affected individuals. Since dementia is a result of brain damage, it will also affect the feeling and behavior of the patient. Do not be too hard on them, but rather be patient and dedicated. Hopefully, with the symptoms above, you can identify dementia in any loved one at an earlier stage than usual.